Burnsville is a city 15 miles (24 km) south of downtown Minneapolis in Dakota County in the U.S. state of Minnesota. The city lies on the south bank of the Minnesota River, upstream from the confluence with the Mississippi River. Burnsville and nearby suburbs form the southern portion of Minneapolis-Saint Paul, the thirteenth largest metropolitan area in the United States, with about 3.2 million residents. The U.S. Census Bureau estimated the city's population at 59,118 in 2007. In addition, the 2008 American Community Survey estimated the city's population at 74,979. Known in the metro area for its regional mall, Burnsville Center, the city is also a recreational attraction with Alimagnet Dog Park, a section of Murphy-Hanrehan Park Reserve, and 310-foot vertical ski peak Buck Hill. Minnesota River wildlife is protected by the Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge. Originally a rural Irish farming community, Burnsville became the tenth largest Minnesotan city in the 2000 Census following the construction of Interstate 35. Currently the sixth largest suburb in the metro area and a bedroom community of both Minneapolis and Saint Paul, the city was fully built by the late 2000s. Burnsville has been building a downtown area called Heart of the City with urban-style retail and condominiums. The Burnsville Transit Station serves as the hub and headquarters of the Minnesota Valley Transit Authority, providing regional bus service to five other suburbs. The population continues to reflect a suburban demographic that was 81.2% Caucasian, 67.5% familial households, and a median household income of $71,687 in the 2008 Census estimate. The name Burnsville is attributed to an early Irish settler and land owner, William Byrne. His surname was recorded as "Burns" and was never corrected.

Train Accident Litigation Lawyers In Burnsville Minnesota

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What is train accident litigation?

Train accidents often occur because of human error, problems with the track, equipment, and/or signal. Oftentimes many people are injured because of train accidents. There are many factors that lead to a railroad accident and there are many people who may be liable. It is the responsibility of the railroad company to maintain the tracks and the train. But truck and car drivers are responsible if they do not follow laws that are intended to protect against accidents. People who are injured in train accidents may be compensated for their injury, lost income, and pain and suffering.

Answers to train accident litigation issues in Minnesota

Railroad accidents may take the form of a collision with another train, a car or bus, or even a solo derailment or...

In certain kinds of cases, lawyers charge what is called a contingency fee. Instead of billing by the hour, the...

Train accident injuries are not limited to catastrophic events such as train collisions. Trains are federally...

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a complex injury with a broad spectrum of symptoms and disabilities. The impact on a...

Burn injuries have recently reached epidemic proportions, with 2.4 million such injuries reported each year with at...

In general, mass tort cases involve a large number of individual claimants with claims associated with a single...

Depending on the details of your case, you may be entitled to compensation for lost wages, medical expenses, and...

Federal court opinions concerning train accident litigation in Minnesota